Journal Codes

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Background

What is a journal code?

Journal codes are used in the Dryad system to determine how and where information is processed and stored within Dryad, and what version of the processing system is used. For example, integrated journals notify Dryad when an article has been accepted for publication or review via email or the API. These notifications include the journal code for the publication. The journal code is a unique identifier for the journal. 

From where do journal codes come?

Currently, the codes do not adhere to any standardized construction rules. 

A Journal Code is the journal-specific abbreviation that Dryad uses for internal management. The journal code is also becoming more visible to Dryad users. A Journal Code is the journal-specific abbreviation that Dryad uses for internal management. Since Journal Names may change, it is preferred to use the Journal Code. If both Journal Name and Journal Code are present in the message, Dryad will use the Journal Code. Currently, the codes do not adhere to any standardized construction rules. Since Journal Names may change, it is preferred to use the Journal Code. If both Journal Name and Journal Code are present in the message, Dryad will use the Journal Code.

Requirements

  1. Journal codes MUST be machine readable, since they provide the basis for software processing.
  2. Journal codes SHOULD be easy for humans to read and type.


Current use cases:

  1. Journals add journal codes to their metadata emails, so the metadata can be associated with the correct journal.
  2. Journals add journal codes to the URL that an author clicks to begin a submission. This ensures the new submission is connected to the correct journal.
  3. Journal codes appear in the URL for journal landing pages.

Design ideas

Ideas/recommendations for Journal Codes

Following are some possibilities for content/format of journal codes:

Journal abbreviation - It is not practical to use journal abbreviations "as is" since they often contain spaces, which are incompatible with some environments. However, the spaces and other nonalphanumeric characters could be removed from the abbreviations, and the abbreviations put together in upper CamelCase or with underscores in between.

Coden - A coden is a piece of metadata used in cataloging to designate a journal. It consists of exactly 6 characters and is formed using a specific formula to create unique combinations. Unfortunately, the coden is deprecated so some newer journals and some foreign journals might not have a coden assigned.

ISSN - An International Standard Serial Number (ISSN) is a unique eight-digit identifier assigned to serial publications. Each journal is assigned as many as three ISSNs: (1) a print ISSN, (2) an online ISSN and (3) a linking ISSN that links the print and online versions. The ISSN with spaces removed could be used as the journal code. The question is: which ISSN - print, online or linking?

General questions

  1. How should changes in journal names affect journal codes?